Archive for the ‘Heaven’ Tag

Resurrection of the Dead, Part IV   Leave a comment

Above:  Resurrection of the Righteous and Coronation of the Virgin, by Francesco Bassano the Younger

Image in the Public Domain

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For the Third Sunday after Easter, Year 2

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Lectionary from A Book of Worship for Free Churches (The General Council of the Congregational Christian Churches in the United States, 1948)

Collect from The Book of Worship (Evangelical and Reformed Church, 1947)

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Almighty God, who showest to them that be in error the light of thy truth,

to the intent that they may return into the way of righteousness;

grant unto all them that are admitted into the fellowship of Christ’s religion

that they may avoid those things that are contrary to their profession,

and follow all such things as are agreeable to the same;

through the same Jesus Christ, our Lord.  Amen.

The Book of Worship (1947), 169-170

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Isaiah 26:12-16, 19

Psalms 122 and 123

2 Timothy 1:3-14

John 11:1-29

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Some texts are clear.  John 11:1-44, for example, makes plain that Jesus raised Lazarus from the dead.  A plain reading of 2 Timothy reveals that the author, writing as St. Paul the Apostle, thought that Jesus had abolished death, of a sort.  Psalm 122 obviously includes a prayer for the peace of Jerusalem.  Psalm 123, another pilgrimage text, is a prayer for divine mercy.

Isaiah 26:19 is ambiguous, though.  Some texts in the Hebrew Bible use life after death as a metaphor for national renewal.  Ezekiel 37 does this, for example.  Daniel 12:2-3, 12 is the only passage in the Hebrew Bible that unambiguously affirms the personal resurrection of the dead.  The germane note in The Jewish Study Bible takes no side in the debate over whether Isaiah 26:19 is literal or metaphorical.  Even rabbis disagree.  So be it.

In Christian theology, the doctrine of the resurrection of the dead relies on more than one passage of scripture anyway.  Beliefs about the afterlife common among Christians have more to do with Greek philosophy than the Bible.  Changing minds regarding this issue can be a challenging task.  Assumptions often become so entrenched that they become so entrenched that they remain despite evidence and education to the contrary.

Ultimately, nobody on this side of the veil knows what lies on the other side.  People have ideas, many of which extend this life into the next one.  Heaven–or whatever one calls it–may seem like an extension of what we know on Earth.  Our human imaginations cannot conceive of what the afterlife is like.  The best we can do is to resort to metaphors and analogies.

I have my ideas.  Heaven and Hell are realities, but not places.  A place has coordinates and geography.  One can map a place.  It is to the north of X or to the west of Y.  Heaven and Hell, I propose, are spiritual realities.  Every person in Heaven got there by grace.  All people in Hell sent themselves.  And you, O reader, and I may be shocked and perhaps even appalled at who is where.

Such matters are in the purview of God, as they have always been.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JANUARY 11, 2021 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT THEODOSIUS THE CENOBIARCH, ROMAN CATHOLIC MONK

THE FEAST OF CHARLES WILLIAM EVEREST, EPISCOPAL PRIEST, POET, AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF MIEP GIES, RIGHTEOUS GENTILE

THE FEAST OF SAINT PAULINUS II OF AQUILEIA, ROMAN CATHOLIC PATRIARCH OF AQUILEIA

THE FEAST OF RICHARD FREDERICK LITTLEDALE, ANGLICAN PRIEST AND TRANSLATOR OF HYMNS

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