Archive for the ‘Franklin Delano Roosevelt’ Tag

Esther IV: Fear Itself   1 comment

Esther--John Everett Millais

Above:  Esther, by John Everett Millais

Image in the Public Domain

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The Collect:

Almighty and ever-living God, you are always more ready than we are to pray,

and you gladly give more than we either desire or deserve.

Pour upon us your abundant mercy.

Forgive us those things that weigh on our conscience,

and give us those good things that come only through your Son,

Jesus Christ, our Savior and Lord.  Amen.

Evangelical Lutheran Worship (2006), page 43

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The Assigned Readings:

Esther 4:1-17

Psalm 138

Luke 8:22-25

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Though I live surrounded by trouble

you give me life–to my enemies’ fury!

You stretch out your right hand and save me,

Yahweh will do all things for me.

Yahweh, your faithful love endures for ever,

do not abandon what you have made.

–Psalm 138:7-8, The New Jerusalem Bible (1985)

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The story in the Book of Esther resumes with the fourth chapter and includes the Greek addition The New American Bible labels Chapter C.  Mordecai and Esther digest the royal decree of genocide against the Jews.  Mordecai is not safe; neither is Esther, although she is the queen consort.  If she goes to visit Ahasuerus without him summoning her first, she risks death.  And if he does not order her death for that reason, he might have her killed for being Jewish.  In Chapter C Mordecai prays for God to deliver the Jews and Esther prays for guidance and for deliverance from fear.

Deliverance from fear occupies the core of Luke 8:22-25, in which Jesus calms a storm.  Although I affirm the proposition that he could have done that, I find the metaphor in the story helpful and the question of the literal story irrelevant to this post.  We experience storms in life.  Sometimes God delivers us from them.  On other occasions, however, God accompanies us through them and delivers us from fear instead.

Esther was correct to know fear.  Ahasuerus had probably ordered the death of Queen Vashti, whose offense had been to refuse to degrade herself.  He was also an easily manipulated monarch through whom others, especially Haman, governed.  Ahasuerus was not powerless, however, for he had the authority to order the execution of someone who went to him uninvited.  Furthermore, he had just ordered genocide against Esther’s people, the Jews.  She could have yielded to fear and laid low.  Esther could have preserved herself at the expense of her fellow Jews, but she found her courage and prayed,

O God, whose power is over all, hear the voice of those in despair.  Save us from the power of the wicked, and deliver me from my fear.

–Esther C:30, The New American Bible–Revised Edition (2011)

On March 4, 1933, in the depths of the Great Depression, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt said,

…the only thing we have to fear is fear itself–nameless, unreasoning, unjustified terror which paralyzes needed efforts to convert retreat into advance.

Out of fear we human beings become more stingy and selfish.  Out of fear we think and act hatefully toward others or merely condone the hateful actions of others.  Out of fear we retreat into passivity when the occasion demands courageous actions.  Out of fear we violate the Golden Rule, often while assuring ourselves of our imagined righteousness.

May we trust in God and act courageously, according to the Golden Rule.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

MARCH 17, 2016 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT PATRICK, BISHOP OF ARMAGH

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Adapted from this post:

https://ordinarytimedevotions.wordpress.com/2016/03/17/devotion-for-saturday-before-proper-12-year-c-elca-daily-lectionary/

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Genesis and Mark, Part XX: Reform or Revolution?   1 comment

casting-out-of-the-money-changers-giotto

Above:  Expulsion of the Money Changers from the Temple, by Giotto

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Blessed Lord, who caused all holy scriptures to be written for our learning:

Grant us so to hear them, read, mark, learn, and inwardly digest them,

that we may embrace and ever hold fast the blessed hope of everlasting life,

which you have given us in our Savior Jesus Christ;

who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,

one God, for ever and ever.  Amen.

The Book of Common Prayer (1979), page 236

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The Assigned Readings:

Genesis 41:28-57

Psalm 84 (Morning)

Psalms 42 and 32 (Evening)

Mark 11:20-33

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Some Related Posts:

Genesis 41:

http://ordinarytimedevotions.wordpress.com/2010/12/22/week-of-proper-9-wednesday-year-1/

Mark 11:

http://adventchristmasepiphany.wordpress.com/2010/11/07/week-of-8-epiphany-friday-year-1/

http://adventchristmasepiphany.wordpress.com/2010/11/07/week-of-8-epiphany-saturday-year-1/

http://ordinarytimedevotions.wordpress.com/2010/11/14/week-of-proper-3-friday-year-1/

http://ordinarytimedevotions.wordpress.com/2010/11/14/week-of-proper-3-saturday-year-1/

Prayer:

http://gatheredprayers.wordpress.com/2011/02/04/prayer-for-the-fourth-sunday-in-lent/

Prayer of Praise and Adoration:

http://gatheredprayers.wordpress.com/2011/02/04/prayer-of-praise-and-adoration-for-the-fourth-sunday-in-lent/

Prayer of Confession:

http://gatheredprayers.wordpress.com/2011/02/04/prayer-of-confession-for-the-fourth-sunday-in-lent/

Prayer of Dedication:

http://gatheredprayers.wordpress.com/2011/02/04/prayer-of-dedication-for-the-fourth-sunday-in-lent/

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 There is a time to work through the system.  And there is a time to confront it.

The Pharonic system was inherently exploitative, creating artificial scarcity.  It was also an absolute monarchy.  There was no constitution or a concept of civil liberties.  So nobody was preparing to found the Egyptian Civil Liberties Union (ECLU), with its infamous papyrus card-carrying members.  Tyranny was the political system.  Yet Joseph used it to feed many people (domestic and foreign) during a severe and prolonged famine.  (Later in Genesis he also enslaved Egyptians to the Pharoah in exchange for food, and the monarch moved people off what had once been their land.  There was no excuse for that, but I am getting ahead of myself.)  Joseph, at this point (Chapter 41) in Genesis, did something great, concrete, and positive.

The Temple system was also inherently exploitative, requiring poor people to pay money changers so that they (the poor) could buy sacrificial animals with currency not tainted with the Roman claim of imperial divinity, and therefore with idolatry.  And the currency changers turned a nice profit, as did the Temple itself.  So Jesus condemned religious profiteering.  Even worse, the Temple, next door to a Roman fortress which towered over it, was the center of collaboration with the occupying Romans.  The timing was also sensitive, for the Passover was the commemoration of God’s deliverance of the Israelites from slavery in Egypt.  So the politics added up, including another attempt to entrap Jesus in his own words.  He, of course, was the superior debater.

There is a time to work through the system in place and therefore to accomplish more good than staging a revolution would permit.  I have not doubt that the New Deal would have faced more difficulties and been less effective had President Franklin Delano Roosevelt pushed for civil rights for African Americans more than he did.  Jim Crow politicians in the South would have erected more barriers than they did.  The lesson is simple:  The perfect must not become the enemy of the good.

Yet there is also a time to confront the system.  The British did have to leave the Indian Subcontinent, for example:  Mohandas Gandhi was correct.  And Apartheid did have to end in the Republic of South Africa, just as Jim Crow had to fall in the United States.  So it is wrong to just a little good when one can do a great deal instead.

May we always know what time it is–time to work through the system and reform it or time to confront it.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

MAY 22, 2012 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF RICHARD BIGGS, ACTOR

THE FEAST OF ROTA WAITOA, ANGLICAN PRIEST

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Adapted from this post:

http://lenteaster.wordpress.com/2012/05/22/devotion-for-the-fourth-sunday-in-lent-lcms-daily-lectionary/

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A Prayer of Thanksgiving for Intelligence   1 comment

Above:  A Home Library

Image Source = User:Sbrools

(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Old_bookshelves.jpg)

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Loving God, whose image we bear,

thank you for the gift of intelligence.

May we express our gratitude in several ways,

including making the most of our intelligence in ways in which you direct us

and by helping others to do the same as we are able.

May we do all this for our mutual benefit

–the building up of the body–

and for your glory.

Amen.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

OCTOBER 26, 2011 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF ALFRED THE GREAT, KING OF THE WEST SAXONS

THE FEAST OF SAINT CEDD, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP OF LONDON

THE FEAST OF DMITRY BORTNIANSKY, COMPOSER

THE FEAST OF PHLIP NICOLAI, JOHANN HEERMANN, AND PAUL GERHARDT, HYMN WRITERS

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Once I read a story about the late Associate Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.  He had arrived at the final stage of his long and illustrious life when President Franklin Delano Roosevelt visited him in the hospital.  Roosevelt was surprised to find Holmes studying a book of ancient Greek grammar.  So the President asked the retired Associate Justice why he was studying ancient Greek grammar on his death bad.  Holmes replied,

To improve my mind, Mister President.

I like that attitude.

KRT

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Adapted from this post:

http://gatheredprayers.wordpress.com/2011/10/26/a-prayer-of-thanksgiving-for-intelligence/

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Having Hope When That is Difficult   1 comment

Above:  President Franklin Delano Roosevelt (In Office 1933-1945)

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Zechariah 8:1-8 (TANAKH:  The Holy Scriptures):

The word of the LORD of Hosts came [to me]:

Thus said the LORD of Hosts:

I am very jealous for Zion; I am fiercely jealous for her.

Thus said the LORD:

I have returned to Zion, and I will dwell in Jerusalem.  Jerusalem will be called the city of Faithfulness, and the mount of the LORD of Hosts the Holy Mount.

Thus said the LORD of Hosts:

There shall yet be of old men and women in the squares of Jerusalem, each with staff in hand because of their great age.  And the squares of the city shall be crowded with boys and girls playing in the squares.

Thus said the LORD of Hosts:

Though it will seem impossible to the remnant of this people in those days, shall it also be impossible to Me?

–declares the LORD of Hosts.

Thus said the LORD of Hosts:

I will rescue My people from the lands of the east and from the lands of the west, and I will bring them home to dwell in Jerusalem.  They shall be My people, and I will be their God–in truth and sincerity.

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Franklin Delano Roosevelt, former Assistant Secretary of the Navy and Democratic nominee for Vice President of the United States in the 1920 election, came down with polio in 1921.  The disease carried a great stigma in those days, so FDR’s career seemed over.  Surely he would spend the rest of his days as a wealthy and paralyzed person.  But his future held the following events:

  • Election as Governor of New York in 1928
  • Re-election in 1930
  • Election as President of the United States in 1932
  • Re-election in 1936, 1940, and 1944
  • Leadership of the nation during the Great Depression and almost all of World War II

All of this was the lot of a man who could not pick himself off the floor when he fell out of his wheelchair.  Yet none of it would have occurred if he had not pursued higher office and others, especially his wife, Eleanor, had not supported him.

Sometimes it is difficult to have hope, for the darkness seems overwhelming.  (I know this fact from a time in my life, albeit a period far less dramatic than 1921-1928 for FDR.)  But there is always hope, if we will grasp it.  And we are not alone; we have God and fellow human beings to help us.  We are not lone wolves and we need not pull ourselves up by our bootstraps.  Rather, we need to do the best we can and rely on our support systems for the rest.  The dependence is mutual, for we lean on others, who, in turn, rely on us.

The reading from Zechariah and the matching portion of Psalm 102 speak of future hope.  Nothing is impossible with God, Zechariah tells us.  In the meantime, the process of restoration, aided by Persian kings and their agents, had begun.  There was a long way yet to go, but at least the process had begun.  So the imperative was to be patient and remain faithful, confident that members of a subsequent generation would witness the fulfillment of the prophecy.

This ethic requires one to think past the desire for instant gratification and the quick fix.  There is no quick fix in this situation, Zechariah says, but there is a fix.  It is in God’s hands, so people ought to leave it there.

Franklin Roosevelt never walked on his own power again, but he helped the United States survive the Great Depression without a revolution.  He gave hope to many people, thereby enabling them to keep going during difficult times.  Hope is a valuable commodity, and hopelessness is devastating.  The latter is, in fact, a major cause of suicide.

Of course, I write these words in a condition of relative comfort.  This sentiment of hopefulness is easy for me to espouse, some might say.  And it is, but I have known very dark times and suicidal feelings, on which I was too terrified to act.  By grace, including human support, I have emerged from the darkness.  My time in darkness strengthened my faith and reminded me that life is a precious gift.  There is always hope, I have learned; all I need to do is grasp it while trusting in God and following this hope in community.

This hope, channeled via people, comes from God, in whom those society considers the least are the greatest.  This hope comes from God, who disregards distinctions to which we gravitate and according to which we define ourselves.  So this hope threatens many people.  This fact indicates the presence of a sin and impels the necessity of repentance–the act of turning around and changing one’s mind.

This hope, however, appeals to those who need it most and who do not hold on to erroneously-based identifications.  It appeals to those who cling to God, who is the only acceptable crutch.

Yes, there is always hope, but we cannot carry our illusions when we walk with the aid of the crutch that is God.  We must lighten our loads during our pilgrimages of faith.  May we do so.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 16, 2011 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT BERNADETTE OF LOURDES, ROMAN CATHOLIC NUN

THE FEAST OF ISABELLA GILMORE, ANGLICAN DEACONESS

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Published originally at ORDINARY TIME DEVOTIONS BY KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR on April 16, 2011 

Adapted from this post:

http://ordinarytimedevotions.wordpress.com/2011/04/16/week-of-proper-21-monday-year-1/

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Posted October 25, 2011 by neatnik2009 in Zechariah 8

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