Archive for the ‘Chalice Worship (1997)’ Tag

Thankful Praise: A Resource for Christian Worship (1987)   2 comments

Disciples of Christ 1941-2003

Above:  Official Worship Resources of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), 1941-2003

Image Source = Kenneth Randolph Taylor

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Some time ago I wrote about other worship resources of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) at this weblog.  At those times I lacked a copy of Thankful Praise (1987).  Now, however, I have obtained and studied a copy, fortunately.

The Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) has, since its founding, observed the Lord’s Supper weekly and emphasized it as the central act of Christian worship.  As “The Renewal of Worship” section of Thankful Praise tells the reader, the relationship between the sermon and the sacrament, as in which one culminates the worship, has varied from congregation to congregation over time.  The dominant tendency since the 1950s “has been to return to the earlier pattern with communion coming as a response to and fulfillment of the proclamation of God’s Word.”  Nevertheless,

worship in many Disciples congregations today is less vigorous than it ought to be.  Our celebrations of the Lord’s Supper often seem to have lost their connection to the historic faith that gives them depth and seem out of touch with contemporary resources of spiritual energy.  Thus, in Disciples congregations, too, the life of thankful praise is in great need of renewal.

–Page 16

Thus Thankful Praise exists not to dictate how worship ought to occur but to offer suggestions to congregational leaders.  Five authors–Ronald J. Allen, Michael K. Kinnamon, Linda McKiernan-Allen, Katherine G. Newman Kinnamon, and Keith Watkins–wrote the 192-page book, which Watkins edited.  Many of the suggestions are wonderful.

Thankful Praise exists in the context of other official volumes; none of the subsequent books duplicates any part of it.  G. Edwin Osborn edited Christian Worship:  A Service Book (1953), the first complete volume of its sort for the denomination.  This book, containing 598 pages, was a companion to Christian Worship:  A Hymnal (1941), a joint project with the Northern (later American) Baptist Convention (later Churches in the U.S.A.).  That hymnal’s successor, the Hymnbook for Christian Worship (1970), also a joint project with the American Baptists, contained a minimum of worship resources.  Thankful Praise (1987) broke new ground, offering fresh resources and banishing archaic language.  The worship resources section of Chalice Hymnal (1995) and the entirety of Chalice Worship (1997) duplicate no part of the 1987 book.  And there are no worship resources in Chalice Praise (2003), a collection of 190 of the allegedly “best and often the freshest of songs that characterize contemporary Christian music” (page vi), an oxymoron if I have ever heard one.

Thankful Praise sets forth “An Order for the Sunday Service” in five parts, with extensive commentary.  The first part is “The Community Comes Together to Serve God in Worship.”  The elements are, verbatim:

  1. Gathering of the Community,
  2. Opening Music,
  3. Greeting,
  4. Hymn, and
  5. Opening Prayer(s).

The second part is “The Community Proclaims the Word of God.  The elements are, verbatim:

  1. First Reading from the Bible,
  2. Psalm or Other Response,
  3. Second or Other Response,
  4. Reading from the Gospel, and
  5. Sermon.

Part Three is “The Community Responds to the Word of God.”  The elements are, verbatim:

  1. Call to Discipleship,
  2. Hymn,
  3. Affirmation of Faith, and
  4. Prayers of the People.

The fourth part is “The Community Comes Together Around the Lord’s Table.”  The elements are, verbatim:

  1. Invitation to the Lord’s Table,
  2. Offering,
  3. Prayers at the Table,
  4. Words of Institution and Breaking of Bread,
  5. Lord’s Prayer,
  6. Peace,
  7. Communion, and
  8. Prayer After Communion.

The final part of the order of service is “The Community Goes Forth to Serve God in Mission.”  The elements are, verbatim:

  1. Hymn,
  2. Closing Words, and
  3. Closing Music.

Seasonal resources fill pages 59-153.  There one may find examples of many of the aforementioned elements of worship, as well as a form for the Lighting of Advent Candles and a rite for meditating on the Cross.

One Prayer of Confession for the Christmas season caught my attention and won my favor more so than most other offerings in Thankful Praise.  If you like the prayer also, O reader, you might want to purchase a copy of the book.

God, we confess that ours is still a world

in which Herod seems to rule:

the powerful are revered,

the visions of the wise are ignored,

the poor are afflicted,

and the innocent are killed.

You show us that salvation comes

in the vulnerability of a child,

yet we hunger for the “security” of weapons and walls.

You teach us that freedom comes in loving service,

yet we trample on others in our efforts to be “free.”

Forgive us, God, when we look to the palace

instead of the stable,

when we heed politicians more than prophets.

Renew us with the spirit of Bethlehem,

That we may be better prepared for your coming.

Amen.

–Page 68

The volume ends with twenty-two Psalms keyed to the church year, a guide to the Common Lectionary, and one page of acknowledgments.

Thankful Praise, intended for the use of those who plan and lead congregational worship, can also function nicely as a supplement to one’s regular devotional resources.  This is especially true for those of us outside of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ).

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BIBLIOGRAPHY OF HARDCOPY SOURCES

Chalice Hymnal.  St. Louis, MO:  Chalice Press, 1995.

Chalice Praise.  Edited by David P. Polk.  St. Louis, MO:  Chalice Press, 2003.

Chalice Worship.  Compiled and Edited by Colbert S. Cartwright and O. I. Cricket Harrison.  St. Louis, MO:  Chalice Press, 1997.

Christian Worship:  A Hymnal.  Philadelphia, PA:  Judson Press, 1941.

Christian Worship:  A Service Book.  Edited by G. Edwin Osborn.  St. Louis, MO:  Christian Board of Publication, 1953.

Hymnbook for Christian Worship.  St. Louis, MO:  Bethany Press, 1970.

Thankful Praise:  A Resource for Christian Worship.  Edited by Keith Watkins.  St. Louis, MO:  CBP Press, 1987.

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KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JULY 7, 2014 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF EUSTACE CONDER, ENGLISH CONGREGATIONALIST MINISTER AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF SAINT HEDDA OF WESSEX, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF SAINTS RALPH MILNER AND ROGER DICKENSON, ROMAN CATHOLIC MARTYRS

THE FEAST SAINT THOMAS MORE, ROMAN CATHOLIC MORE

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Chalice Hymnal (1995)–Worship Resources   6 comments

christian-church-disciples-of-christ-logo

Above:  Logo of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)

Last Summer, I reviewed Chalice Worship (1997) (https://blogatheologica.wordpress.com/2012/06/29/chalice-worship-1997/).  Now I turn my attention to the non-musical content at the back of Chalice Hymnal (1995).

The Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) does belong to the free church tradition, but it is still liturgical.  In fact, it has a venerable history of emphasizing Holy Communion.  As Father Peter Ingeman, now-retired Rector of Christ Episcopal Church, Valdosta, Georgia, said at a Lay Ministries Conference in the Diocese of Georgia in Spring 2001, a liturgical church is one with a predictable pattern of worship.  Some liturgies are simpler or more complex than others, but they are, by definition, predictable.

The non-musical liturgical resources in Chalice Hymnal (1995) do not appear in Chalice Worship (1997), so I review them here for the first time.  The Worship Resources section of the hymnal contains the following:

  1. An Order for the Lord’s Supper with Those Confined;
  2. Basic Resources for Sunday Worship; and
  3. Daily Worship (A Three-Year Cycle of Daily Devotion).

I will deal with them in that order.

An Order for the Lord’s Supper with Those Confined draws the visited person(s) into the congregational gathering linguistically with the repeated use of the words “we” and “us.”  In the first paragraph–five sentences–alone, “we” appears three times, “us” twice, and “ourselves” once.  This is excellent, for those confined at home, in a hospital or nursing home, or elsewhere might feel isolated, understandably.  Yet they are part of the whole, the community of faith.

Basic Resources for Sunday Worship, six pages long, is an outline for worship.  It contains prayers, litanies, a communion ritual, and pastoral sentences.  The language is modern and graceful, focusing on the Christian community.  Plural pronouns abound; one notices “us,” “we,” and “our,” quite often.  And “you,” when it appears, is plural.  This is appropriate, for Jesus-and-meism is a heresy.

Daily Worship:  A Three-Year Cycle of Daily Devotion is the handiwork of the Reverend Colbert S. Cartwright (http://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2012/06/29/feast-of-colbert-s-cartwright-august-5/), truly a great man. (I even canonized him last June!)  The three-page-long Introduction emphasizes the importance of praising God with a daily hymn, praying one psalm per week, and reading and meditating upon a passage of Scripture each day.  The Introduction is a nicely-written primer on prayer from which one may benefit, even if one does not use use the ensuing eighteen-page lectionary.  I have not used that lectionary yet, although I have kept the option open.  I do recognize a well-thought-out plan when I see one.

I am a practicing Episcopalian, therefore a person of The Book of Common Prayer (1979).  But I do not restrict myself to that volume for purposes of prayer and worship; the Prayer Book is simply my primary resource in those fields.  I like to sample the liturgical resources of other denominations and to utilize the best of them.  The Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) offers much that appeals to my honed liturgical tastes.  One irony might be that I use them more than do many active members of that body.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JANUARY 3, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE TENTH DAY OF CHRISTMAS

THE FEAST OF EDWARD CASWALL, ROMAN CATHOLIC PRIEST AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF EDWARD PERRONET, BRITISH METHODIST PREACHER

THE FEAST OF SAINT GENEVIEVE, PROPHET

THE FEAST OF GLADYS AYLWARD, ANGLICAN MISSIONARY TO CHINA

Chalice Worship (1997)   7 comments

Above:  Logo of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)

Chalice Worship is one of my favorite volumes, one which functions for me as one of a set of prayer books.  It takes its place along side The Book of Common Prayer (1979), A New Zealand Prayer Book (1989), and a volume of novenas.  I, with my Episcopal Church-honed liturgical tastes, enjoy the fresh, reverent, and poetic language of Chalice Worship.  The resources in this book differ from those I have found elsewhere, so the volume is unique, adding welcome spice to a variety of well-written liturgical life.

Chalice Worship, a resource of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), is a companion to Chalice Hymnal, the denomination’s 1995 successor to Hymnbook for Christian Worship (1970), a joint project with the American Baptist Churches U.S.A., then called the American Baptist Convention.  CW (1997) is, in a way, a successor to that book, which contains worship resources (although mainly in older-style English) in the back.  CW (1997) is primarily the successor to Christian Worship:  A Service Book (1953),

The first and last complete book of worship resources…..It set a benchmark for any would come after him [editor G. Edwin Osborn] in similar labors.

Chalice Worship, page xii

CW (1997) complements Thankful Praise (1987), edited by Keith Watkins, and Chalice Hymnal (1995), not replicating material from them.

The scope of Chalice Worship is comprehensive.  There are the usual services, such as Holy Communion, baptism, confirmation, marriage, healing, and funerals, for example.  But one can also find a service to celebrate a wedding anniversary and another to bless a friendship.  And the funeral service comes with options for various occasions, such as a suicide, a sudden tragedy, and a stillbirth.  There are also daily morning and evening prayer services, which are beautiful.

There is also a section of three ecumenical services:  the Lord’s Supper, Martin Luther King, Jr., Day, and Thanksgiving.  These appeal to me because of my bad experiences with community worship services; they tend to be flavorless bastard stepchildren of liturgy, appealing to few or none while attempting to encompass all or as many as possible.  But these ecumenical rites have two parents who are glad to claim them as their own.

These parents are Colbert “Bert” S. Cartwright (http://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2012/06/29/feast-of-colbert-s-cartwright-august-5/) and O. I. Cricket Harrison.  They served on the committee which produced Chalice Hymnal (1995).  Cartwright, who died in 1996, was a Disciples of Christ minister and a witness for civil rights in the U.S. South when that was unpopular with many other white people.  Harrison composed hymn tunes and descants, translated a hymn from Spanish, and wrote a hymn one can find in that hymnal.  And she, with the help of Ann Cartwright, Colbert’s widow, and David P. Polk, editor of Chalice Press (as she wrote,

the unnamed third editor of this work

Chalice Worship, page xiii)

brought the volume to completion.  I thank God for all that they did toward that goal.

Back to my summary….

Chalice Worship also  provides services for the Christian Year and special Sundays.  So, for example, Advent, Christmas, Lenten, Holy Week, Easter Vigil, Easter Sunday, Pentecost, and Trinity Sunday resources are present.  The Feast of Christ the King (as I know and celebrate it each year) has become “The Festival of Christ the Cosmic Ruler.”  That is fine, for “king” is just a metaphor; I will not become upset about it.  And one can find rites for special Sundays ranging from Father’s Day to Mother’s Day to All Saints’ Day to Labor Day to AIDS Sunday.  There are also resources for the Week of Compassion (the third to fourth Sundays in February), when the Disciples of Christ collect funds to alleviate global suffering.  Compassion is a good thing.

One can also find resources for occasional events, such as installing church offices, honoring graduates, saying farewell to a retiring minister, opening a meeting or conference, blessing a home, or blessing a mother and a child after a difficult birth.  If a congregation has divided, it might avail itself of a prayer for that occasion.  Given recent headlines in ecclesiastical and collegiate settings, the Prayer for One Who Has Been Molested seems timely.

My favorite part of the book however, is its comprehensive selection of short prayers and litanies for various occasions.  I have found them quite helpful.  Once, a few years ago, when I needed the prayer “For the Brokenhearted” (page 364), I posted it online, giving credit to the source, of course.  Shortly later I received a comment from a complete stranger.  That person wrote,

Thank you.

My advice, O reader of this post, is to use this book at least for individual prayer, and corporate worship if possible.  Share it with others.  Such a wonderful resource, Colbert S. Cartwright’s final work, deserves no less.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JUNE 29, 2012 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINTS PETER AND PAUL, APOSTLES AND MARTYRS

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