The Restoration of Jerusalem   Leave a comment

Above:  Jeremiah

Image in the Public Domain

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

READING JEREMIAH, PART XX

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Jeremiah 32:1-33:26

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

The given timeframe in 32:1-33:26 begins during the Babylonian/Neo-Chaldean siege of Jerusalem and continues through the immediate aftermath of the fall of the city in 386 B.C.E.  We read that King Zedekiah had incarcerated Jeremiah for prophesying against Jerusalem–for telling the inconvenient and unpopular truth.  We read that Jeremiah was still in prison when the city fell.  We also read prophecies of the restoration of Jerusalem.

Many themes from earlier in the Book of Jeremiah and other Hebrew prophetic books composed or begun to that point repeat in Jeremiah 32:1-33:26.  I acknowledge their existence without further comment–with one exception.

Having such faith in God as to affirm the restoration of Jerusalem while the Kingdom of Judah fell in 586 B.C.E. was remarkable.  A chapter in recorded history ended catastrophically.  The Jews did not achieve political independence in their homeland again until the time of the Hasmoneans.  The future that unfolded between the Fall of Jerusalem (586 B.C.E.) and the rise of independent Judea (142 B.C.E.; read 1 Maccabees 13:31-14:29) was not what prophets had predicted.  The Davidic Dynasty did not return to power.  The land was not a utopia with God as the king.  Reality did not match expectations.  And, after Judea became independent in 142 B.C.E., Hasmonean priest-kings proved they were mere mortals, capable of petty politics and bad decisions.  Judean independence ended in 63 B.C.E., when the Roman Republic took over.

Having faith that God would eventually restore Jerusalem as the Chaldean/Neo-Babylonian army took that city was remarkable.  Yet that faith was also realistic.

Faith in God may be difficult at times, but it is also realistic.  We mere mortals may get some of the details of our expectations wrong, but God remains faithful to divine promises.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JUNE 13, 2021 COMMON ERA

PROPER 6:  THE THIRD SUNDAY AFTER PENTECOST, YEAR B

THE FEAST OF SAINT SPYRIDON OF CYPRUS, BISHOP OF TREMITHUS, CYPRUS; AND HIS CONVERT, SAINT TRYPHILLIUS OF LEUCOSIA, CYPRUS; OPPONENTS OF ARIANISM

THE FEAST OF DAVID ABEEL, U.S. DUTCH REFORMED MINISTER AND MISSIONARY TO ASIA

THE FEAST OF ELIAS BENJAMIN SANFORD, U.S. METHODIST THEN CONGREGATIONAL MINISTER AND ECUMENIST

THE FEAST OF SIGISMUND VON BIRKEN, GERMAN LUTHERAN HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF WILLIAM CULLEN BRYANT, U.S. POET, JOURNALIST, AND HYMN WRITER

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: