Humility Before People and God, Part II   Leave a comment

Above:  Christ Pantocrator

Scan by Kenneth Randolph Taylor

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For the Sunday After the Ascension, Year 1

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Lectionary from A Book of Worship for Free Churches (The General Council of the Congregational Christian Churches in the United States, 1948)

Collect from The Book of Worship (Evangelical and Reformed Church, 1947)

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O God, the King of glory, who through the resurrection and ascension of our Lord Jesus Christ,

hast opened the kingdom of heaven to all believers;

leave us not comfortless, we beseech thee, in our weary mortal state,

but send unto us the Holy Spirit, the Comforter,

to guide us into the way of truth and peace;

through Jesus Christ our Lord.  Amen.

The Book of Worship (1947), 178

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Isaiah 32:1-4, 15-20

Psalm 97

Philippians 2:1-11

Matthew 28:16-20

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This week’s set of readings offers a series of contrasts.  God’s order is better than the current world order, in which people mistake knaves for gentlemen and in which the exploitation of the poor is rampant.  God is a better king than the any of the bad monarchs of Israel and Judah.  Jesus is an exemplar of humility and obedience to God, unlike many people one may call to mind easily.  And, at the end of the Gospel of Matthew, we read the Great Commission and of the mission of the Gentiles.  One may recall that, earlier in that Gospel, the mission had been to Jews.

Humility is the focus of this post.  Humilty involves having a balanced ego, a realistic self-image.  It does not mean,

I’m a worthless piece of human slime.

No, being humble means recognizing one’s self-worth and the worth of all other people, too.  Humility involves, in the words of the epistle, counting others as more valuable than oneself.  This attitude will lead to actions.

Humility is a quality frequently lacking in potentates.  When a humble person does come to power, that individual’s tenure is often too brief.  How much better would we all be if more of those in power were humble?

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 10, 2020 COMMON ERA

GOOD FRIDAY

THE FEAST OF PIERRE TEILHARD DE CHARDIN, ROMAN CATHOLIC PRIEST, SCIENTIST, AND THEOLOGIAN

THE FEAST OF SAINT FULBERT OF CHARTRES, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF HENRY VAN DYKE, U.S. PRESBYTERIAN MINISTER AND THEOLOGIAN

THE FEAST OF HOWARD THURMAN, U.S. PROTESTANT THEOLOGIAN

THE FEAST OF WILLIAM LAW, ANGLICAN PRIEST, MYSTIC, AND SPIRITUAL WRITER

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