A Call for a More Inclusive and Thorough Lectionary   Leave a comment

Above:  Some of my Bibles, November 6, 2018

Photographer = Kenneth Randolph Taylor

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The Reverend Timothy Matthew Slemmons, writing in Year D (2012), noted that the Revised Common Lectionary (1992), with its three-year cycle and two tracks between Pentecost and Christ the King Sunday, covers about one-quarter of the (Protestant) Bible.  He also noted that a seven-year cycle would be necessary for nearly complete coverage.

Why not have a seven-year cycle, at least?  There are, for many, theological issues with the Deuterocanon, of course.  A hypothetical lectionary committee might get around this difficulty by scheduling Hebrew canonical readings as alternatives to Deuterocanonical lections.

But why not an eight-year cycle?  Here are some details:

  1. Read the entirety of all the canonical Gospels–Matthew (Years A and E), Mark (Years B and F), Luke (Years C and G), and John (Years D and H).
  2. Read every word of the Acts of the Apostles and all the epistles, including those that are epistles in name only.  (I mean you, Hebrews.)
  3. Read all of the Book of Psalms, including the passages that make many people cringe, such as the end of Psalm 137, with fantasies of dashing the heads of enemies’ children against stones.
  4. Take the deep dive into the Hebrew prophets.
  5. Read the epic stories of the Hebrew Bible.
  6. Give the Wisdom literature its due.
  7. Yes, read Revelation, the Apocalypse of John.
  8. Provide just one track all year, every year.
  9. Do not refrain from reading any of the “texts of terror.”

The Revised Common Lectionary, for all its virtues, does avoid many difficult passages.  I notice this, for I teach a lectionary class in my parish during the Sunday School time.  I have a Bible open in front of me as I teach, so I see the conveniently omitted verses.  I respect the Bible and revere God enough to read even those passages that make me uncomfortable.  Sometimes I argue with them, but I do so faithfully, as when I notice the quoted (and affirmed) slur against Cretans in Titus 1:12.

The Bible is a theologically diverse–sometimes self-contradictory–and rich theological anthology.  Even we who study it seriously and frequently can always learn more from it.  Even we who study the Bible seriously and frequently need to study it more than we do.  A longer-term lectionary can provide an invaluable Bible study tool for use in congregations of a range of denominations.

I call for a more thorough and inclusive lectionary–one more inclusive of “texts of terror,” books overlooked and insufficiently sampled in the Revised Common Lectionary, and of various types of Biblical literature.  This will require more than three years per cycle; so be it.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

NOVEMBER 6, 2018 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF CHRISTIAN GREGOR, FATHER OF MORAVIAN CHURCH MUSIC

THE FEAST OF GIOVANNI GABRIELI AND HANS LEO HASSLER, COMPOSERS AND ORGANISTS; AND CLAUDIO MONTEVERDI AND HEINRICH SCHUTZ, COMPOSERS AND MUSICIANS

THE FEAST OF THEOPHANE VENARD, ROMAN CATHOLIC PRIEST, MISSIONARY, AND MARTYR IN VIETNAM

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Posted November 6, 2018 by neatnik2009 in Psalm 137, Titus 1, Worship and Liturgy

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