Psalm 107   1 comment

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POST XLIII OF LX

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The Book of Common Prayer (1979) includes a plan for reading the Book of Psalms in morning and evening installments for 30 days.  I am therefore blogging through the Psalms in 60 posts.

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Blessed Lord, who caused all holy Scriptures to be written for our learning:

Grant us so to hear them, read, mark, learn, and inwardly digest them,

that we may embrace and ever hold fast the blessed hope of everlasting life,

which you have given us in our Savior Jesus Christ;

who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.  Amen.

The Book of Common Prayer (1979), page 226

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I have little to write about Psalm 107, which continues the pattern of writing of the forty or so years the Israelites wandered in the wilderness in the context of the postexilic period.  I note that Psalm 107, with its focus on the faithfulness of God, is closer in tone to Psalm 105 than to Psalm 106, although Psalm 107 does contain the obvious element of human sin.  I also notice that the grouping of Psalms 105-107 in their cluster is logical.  I cannot help but repeat myself theologically, so I quote J. Clinton McCann, Jr., from Volume IV (1996) of The New Interpreter’s Bible:

Thus the message of Psalm 107 is simple but radical:  There is ultimately no such thing as self-sufficiency, for human life depends on God.  The good news is that we can depend on God.

–Page 1119

Do we affirm this?  Do live according to this?  Doing so can be difficult, I know; I continue to struggle with it, off and on.  The struggle is in itself a positive indication, for it proves the existence of faith in God.

We can depend on God.  May we know it and never forget it.  Thus, stepping out on faith, may we follow, not step away from, God.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

AUGUST 18, 2017 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF ERDMANN NEUMEISTER, GERMAN LUTHERAN MINISTER AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF WILLIAM PORCHER DUBOSE, EPISCOPAL THEOLOGIAN

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  1. Pingback: Guide Post to the Septuagint Psalter Project | BLOGA THEOLOGICA

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