Psalm 105   2 comments

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

POST XLI OF LX

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

The Book of Common Prayer (1979) includes a plan for reading the Book of Psalms in morning and evening installments for 30 days.  I am therefore blogging through the Psalms in 60 posts.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Blessed Lord, who caused all holy Scriptures to be written for our learning:

Grant us so to hear them, read, mark, learn, and inwardly digest them,

that we may embrace and ever hold fast the blessed hope of everlasting life,

which you have given us in our Savior Jesus Christ;

who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.  Amen.

The Book of Common Prayer (1979), page 226

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Psalm 105 comes from the time after the end of the Babylonian Exile.  The author of the first fifteen verses (which also appear in 1 Chronicles 16:8-22) begins with Abraham and traces the covenant and the faithfulness of God through the time of Moses.

Concluding the psalm in the wilderness of the Sinai was an interesting choice.  It was consistent with the state of the Jews in Judea shortly after the end of the exile.  Life in the ancestral homeland during the early Persian period did not match the predictions of life in Heaven on earth.  Returned exiles, who lived in a wilderness of a sort, needed encouragement.

The sense of disappointment is a frequent human reality.  At such times considering what God has done is a proper practice.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

AUGUST 18, 2017 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF ERDMANN NEUMEISTER, GERMAN LUTHERAN MINISTER AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF WILLIAM PORCHER DUBOSE, EPISCOPAL THEOLOGIAN

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

2 responses to “Psalm 105

Subscribe to comments with RSS.

  1. Pingback: Psalm 107 | BLOGA THEOLOGICA

  2. Pingback: Guide Post to the Septuagint Psalter Project | BLOGA THEOLOGICA

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: