Religious Persecution and Fearless Confession of Faith   1 comment

The wrath of Ahasuerus *oil on canvas *81,2 x 98,5 cm *indistinctly signed r. *circa 1668 - 1670

Above:  The Wrath of Ahasuerus, by Jan Steen

Image in the Public Domain

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The Collect:

O God of life, you reach out to us amid our fears

with the wounded hands of your risen Son.

By your Spirit’s breath revive our faith in your mercy,

and strengthen us to be the body of your Son,

Jesus Christ, our Savior and Lord, who lives and reigns

with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever.  Amen.

Evangelical Lutheran Worship (2006), page 33

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The Assigned Readings:

Esther 7:1-10 (Monday)

Esther 8:1-17 (Tuesday)

Esther 9:1-5, 18-23 (Wednesday)

Psalm 122 (All Days)

Revelation 1:9-20 (Monday)

Revelation 2:8-11 (Tuesday)

Luke 12:4-12 (Wednesday)

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I was glad when they said to me,

“Let us go to the house of the LORD.”

–Psalm 122:1, The Book of Common Prayer (1979)

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The reading from Luke 12 states the theme for this post.  The call to remain faithful to God is also a major theme in the Books of Esther and Revelation, where the context is persecution.  In Esther the threat is an impending genocide.

The Book of Esther is a work of fiction, but that fact does not indicate that the text teaches no truth.  The character of King Ahasuerus is that of an easily manipulated absolute monarch and a man who demands complete obedience.  The portrayal of him is quite unflattering.  Certainly Esther takes a great risk when going to him, admitting her Jewish identity, and asking the monarch to halt the genocide before it begins.

Another major theme in Revelation is that God will win in the end.  Until then many people will have to decide whether to confess their faith fearlessly and in a positive manner, fearlessly and in a negative manner, or to take the easy way out of the path of danger.  To profess one’s faith fearlessly and positively, in the style of Psalm 122, is easy in good circumstances, which many of us are fortunate to enjoy.  I am blessed, for example, to live in a nation-state where nobody acts to prevent me from attending the congregation of my choice and where I have the opportunity to write and publish these religious posts without legal consequences.  Unfortunately, many of my fellow human beings are not as fortunate.  The true test of my mettle would be what I would do if I were to live in a context of religious persecution.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

DECEMBER 20, 2015 COMMON ERA

THE FOURTH SUNDAY OF ADVENT, YEAR C

THE FEAST OF SAINT DOMINIC OF SILOS, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBOT

THE FEAST OF SAINT PETER CANISIUS, ROMAN CATHOLIC PRIEST

THE FEAST OF WILLIAM JOHN BLEW, ENGLISH PRIEST AND HYMN WRITER

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Adapted from this post:

https://lenteaster.wordpress.com/2015/12/20/devotion-for-monday-tuesday-and-wednesday-after-the-second-sunday-of-easter-year-c-elca-daily-lectionary/

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One response to “Religious Persecution and Fearless Confession of Faith

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  1. Pingback: Devotion for Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday After the Second Sunday of Easter, Year C (ELCA Daily Lectionary) | LENTEN AND EASTER DEVOTIONS

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